Dessert Wine

Dessert Wine

While dessert wine is centuries old, it is still an enigma to most ardent wine lovers (there is no consistent definition of this drink). Its sweetness and high alcohol content makes it almost impossible to be included on the list of dinner party wines. Should dessert wine be paired with food? Should it not be paired? What glass should suitably be used to serve this drink? All these questions tend to haunt those considering drinking dessert wines. Just like any other type of wine, the answers to these questions depend on your preferences. However, dessert wine should be served with food, which should, in terms of sweetness, be equal or more than the wine itself. Due to its alcohol content and intense flavors, dessert wine should also be served in small glasses (smaller than those used for table wine).

Generally, there are two categories of dessert wine: fortified and non-fortified wines. Fortified dessert wines contain alcohol, which is usually added during fermentation process. Examples of fortified dessert wines include Sherry and Port. On the other hand, non-fortified dessert wine gets its sweetness from other methods other than fortification. Botrytis cinere wine

and ice wine are some of the most popular non-fortified dessert wines.